Tokyo Olympics: Christine Mboma deprived of 400m because of too high testosterone

Advertisement

World’s best performer of the year over 400m (48 “54), Namibian Christine Mboma will not be able to match this distance at the Tokyo Olympics because of too high testosterone levels.

Advertisement

Young Namibian athlete Christine Mboma (18), 400m revelation of the year, will not be able to match her favorite distance at the Tokyo Olympics due to naturally too high testosterone levels, the committee said. Namibian Olympic Friday.

Surprised to become the 7th best performer of all time over 400m on Wednesday in Bydgoszcz (Poland) in 48.54, Christine Mboma is finally concerned by the regulations on hyperandrogenic athletes, like the South African Caster Semenya.

Advertisement

Christine Mboma and her compatriot Beatrice Masilingi (also 18), who have both exploded to the highest level in recent months, were recently tested in Italy near their training camp.

“The results of the test center indicate that both athletes have naturally high testosterone levels (…) they are not eligible for events ranging from 400m to mile (1.609m),” writes the Namibian Olympic committee in a report. communicated.

Advertisement

The regulation on hyperandrogenism requires treatment

Entered into force in 2019, the regulation on hyperandrogenism requires the athletes concerned to undergo treatment to lower their testosterone levels for six consecutive months before being able to participate in an international competition of the 400 m per mile (1,609 m).

ALSO READ  PSG: Verratti twice positive for coronavirus in two months, how is that possible?

Mboma, best performer of the year, and Masilingi, therefore find themselves deprived of 400m at the Tokyo Olympics (July 23 – August 8), where Caster Semenya will not be able to defend her two titles acquired over 800m.

Advertisement

The two Namibians will however be traveling to Japan where they will focus on the 200m, a discipline where they are far from the best in the world.

“We are optimistic for their future as elite athletes. This should not be seen negatively but rather as a new challenge or a new opportunity,” wrote their Olympic committee.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.